William Shenstone Poems

Poems » william shenstone

William Shenstone
William Shenstone (November 18, 1714 February 11, 1763) was an English poet and one of the earliest practitioners of landscape gardening through the development of his estate, The Leasowes. Son of Thomas Shenstone and Anne Penn, daughter of William Penn of Harborough Hall, then in Hagley (now Blakedown), Shenstone was born at the Leasowes, Halesowen. At that time this was an enclave of Shropshire within the traditional county of Worcestershire. While attending Solihull School, he began a lifelong friendship with Richard Jago. He went up to Pembroke College, Oxford in 1732 and made another firm friend there in Richard Graves, the author of The Spiritual Quixote. Shenstone took no degree, but, while still at Oxford, he published Poems on various occasions, written for the entertainment of the author (1737). This edition was intended for private circulation only but, containing the first draft of The Schoolmistress, it attracted some wider attention. Shenstone tried hard to suppress it but in 1742 he published anonymously a revised draft of The Schoolmistress, a Poem in imitation of Spenser. The inspiration of the poem was Sarah Lloyd, teacher of the village school where Shenstone received his first education. Isaac D'Israeli contended that Robert Dodsley had been misled in publishing it as one of a sequence of Moral Poems, its intention having been satirical, as evidenced by the ludicrous index appended to its original publication.

the solitary reaper
 
 
Behold her, single in the field,
Yon solitary Highland Lass!
Reaping and singing by hersel... [read poem]
she dwelt among the untrodden ways
 
 
She dwelt among the untrodden ways
Beside the springs of Dove,
A Maid whom there were none... [read poem]
the world is too much with us
 
 
The World is too much with us; late and soon,
Getting and spending, we lay waste our powers:... [read poem]
daffodils
 
 
I wandered lonely as a cloud
That floats on high o'er vales and hills,
When all at once I ... [read poem]
the simplon pass
 
 
-Brook and road
Were fellow-travellers in this gloomy Pass,
And with them did we journey s... [read poem]
composed upon westminster bridge, september 3, 1802
 
 
Earth has not anything to show more fair:
Dull would he be of soul who could pass by
A sig... [read poem]
a pastoral ballad, absence
 
 
Ye shepherds so cheerful and gay,
Whose flocks never carelessly roam;
Should Corydon's... [read poem]
the tables turned
 
 
Up! up! my Friend, and quit your books;
Or surely you'll grow double:
Up! up! my Friend, a... [read poem]
if a daughter you have
 
 
If a daughter you have, she's the plague of your life,
No peace shall you know, tho' you've bur... [read poem]
london, 1802
 
 
Milton! thou shouldst be living at this hour:
England hath need of thee: she is a fen
Of s... [read poem]
a complaint
 
 
There is a change--and I am poor;
Your love hath been, nor long ago,
A fountain at my fond... [read poem]
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